End of the world? Comet strike in Russia

#1
This is a video about the comet strike in Russia, it's the vanguard of the first waves of comets tha''s going past Earth, at least that's what NASA's says. But gravity is'nt a reliable science, there might be a scenario that the comet is stuck in Eart's gravitational pull, and slams into Earth, like the part that slammed into Russia. Video here:

 
#4
The good news is that the meteorite strike did not result in deaths (1,200 injuries).
Yeah, still a large amounts of wounded for only a small comet, and ofcourse the material damage. Perhaps this will happen more often in the future, the Earths magneticshield has also been decreased by pollution. Just look at the gaps we have in our ozonelare.

Ahwell, mankind will be eradicated sooner or later anyway, having thousands of nukes, something must go wrong sometime. Either manmade of mother earth(mother universe).
 
#5
impressive vids
they are saying that it has nothing to do with the asteroid passing by
not sure whether to believe the government
Yeah, even if theirs a massive astroid coming straight to Earth, doubt they will let people know unless it's one hour before impact. While they safely retreat to their bunkers, so the rest of us can die.
 

Torpedo

Male
Gold Member
#6
Yeah, still a large amounts of wounded for only a small comet, and ofcourse the material damage. Perhaps this will happen more often in the future, the Earths magneticshield has also been decreased by pollution. Just look at the gaps we have in our ozonelare.

Ahwell, mankind will be eradicated sooner or later anyway, having thousands of nukes, something must go wrong sometime. Either manmade of mother earth(mother universe).
The ozone layer isn't going to do anything to stop a comet or asteroid impact whether the ozone layer has holes in it or not. The ozone blocks UV radiation, it has no effect on protecting the planet from impact events. The earth gains around 15,000 tons of material every year from various size objects running into the planet. A strike like the one in Russia comes along about every 30 or 40 years. There is a constant bombardment of stuff that is smaller. Since the planet is covered with about 70 percent water most of these events happen where there is no no to see them and the ocean swallows anything that makes it to the surface. The little stuff burns up at high altitude and isn't noticeable from the ground.

Technologically we are are at the cusp of being able to prevent or deflect a major impact event. One of the problems is that there are probably a few million rocks floating around the solar system like the one that hit Russia. While these aren't going to cause damage on a planetary scale a direct hit on a major metropolitan area could be devastating. I was really surprised there were no fatalities with the Russian event given the number of injuries.

Major impacts like the one at K-T boundary happen only every several million years. If one of these was heading toward us we would be pretty well screwed unless we has a couple of decades advance. However if we had a long period comet out of the Oort cloud and we had only a few months warning, then go max out the credit cards, get layed a lot, and tell your boss to bite your ass.It is highly unlikely that humanity would survive an event like the K-T one. And if we did civilization would be starting over. The lucky ones would be the ones that died right away.
 
#7
The ozone layer isn't going to do anything to stop a comet or asteroid impact whether the ozone layer has holes in it or not. The ozone blocks UV radiation, it has no effect on protecting the planet from impact events. The earth gains around 15,000 tons of material every year from various size objects running into the planet. A strike like the one in Russia comes along about every 30 or 40 years. There is a constant bombardment of stuff that is smaller. Since the planet is covered with about 70 percent water most of these events happen where there is no no to see them and the ocean swallows anything that makes it to the surface. The little stuff burns up at high altitude and isn't noticeable from the ground.

Technologically we are are at the cusp of being able to prevent or deflect a major impact event. One of the problems is that there are probably a few million rocks floating around the solar system like the one that hit Russia. While these aren't going to cause damage on a planetary scale a direct hit on a major metropolitan area could be devastating. I was really surprised there were no fatalities with the Russian event given the number of injuries.

Major impacts like the one at K-T boundary happen only every several million years. If one of these was heading toward us we would be pretty well screwed unless we has a couple of decades advance. However if we had a long period comet out of the Oort cloud and we had only a few months warning, then go max out the credit cards, get layed a lot, and tell your boss to bite your ass.It is highly unlikely that humanity would survive an event like the K-T one. And if we did civilization would be starting over. The lucky ones would be the ones that died right away.
Is''nt protection against UV radiation just as important as protection against comets? Skin cancer i'nt exactly a good thing.

What about the Earth magnetic shield, has'nt that been weakend over the decades? I never heard about a "bombardment" that happenend constantly. Can you imagine the panic if such a thing happened in Manhattan, the chaos.
 

Torpedo

Male
Gold Member
#8
Is''nt protection against UV radiation just as important as protection against comets? Skin cancer i'nt exactly a good thing.

What about the Earth magnetic shield, has'nt that been weakend over the decades? I never heard about a "bombardment" that happenend constantly. Can you imagine the panic if such a thing happened in Manhattan, the chaos.
The magnetic field protects the planet from most of the effects of the solar wind. If we didn't have a magnetic field the solar wind would slowly strip away our atmosphere. The earth's magnetic field reverses polarity from time to time and there is some evidence that the field is weakening and may reverse some time in the not too distant future. The big unknown is how much additional radiation will the earth's surface get. In geological terms the reverse happens quickly, in human terms it might take 20 or maybe even 200 years for the magnetic field to re establish itself after a polarity reverse. When dealing with time frames that are millions of years long it is virtually impossible to determine what actually has happened in the past during a blip of only a hundred years or so. Most likely there would be a period of increased cancers and mutations. Extinction id unlikely as these events have happened a number of times in the past and as far as I know no significant extinction events have been connected with them

Yes the ozone layer is important for blocking UV radiation but is does not nothing to protect the earth from any impacts. The hole in the antarctic is getting smaller but there is any data about the ozone layer that is much more than about 35 or 40 years old or so we really don't know what is normal. If the magnetic field reverses and is much weakened or non existent for a period of time the ozone layer is likely to take a severe beating from the solar wind.

Most of the 15,000 tons or so that the earth gains every year is in the form of dust and small meteorites. It doesn't get mentioned because it's presence and effects are negligible. 50 foot rocks only come along every 30 or 40 years and yes you can bet your ass that if one of the 50 foot ones came down over a large city it would do serious damage. The blast effect and intensity would depend on a number of factors, such as with weight of the object, it's speed and at what altitude it exploded. It is my understanding the event in Russia yielded approximately 2.5 megatons. That is 2 and a half million tons of TNT equivalent. In contrast the the Hiroshima nuclear blast was about 16 kilotons, that is 16 thousand tons of TNT equivalent. The release of energy in a meteor blast is a little slower that a nuke but both can be very destructive. It should also be understood that in a meteor or asteroid impact there isn't any real explosive material. There is the latent energy the object contains due to it's velocity, when it enters the atmosphere friction heats the object up, as it gets lower in the atmosphere the air gets denser and very often the object compresses the air in from of it to the point that the air behaves like a brick wall and the object shatters. You have a shock wave, heat, falling peices and altogether a lot of unpleasant things going on.
 

Torpedo

Male
Gold Member
#9
I need to correct my comment above. The blast of the Russian meteor has been calculated to be in the range of about 500 kilotons not the 2 and half megatons that I stated above. I try to stick to the facts as best I can.